The Nautical Almanac & Its Superintendents
Previous
Next

1818: Thomas Young, 1st Superintendent 1818-1829

 
Thomas Young

Thomas Young

© The Royal Society

Thomas Young (1773-1829), physician and scientist established the principle of interference of light and he was also an Egyptologist who helped decipher the Rosetta Stone. In 1802 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.

In 1818 he was appointed Secretary of the Board of Longitude. Following the poor reputation that the Almanac (The Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris (NA & AE)) had rightly gained, he was appointed as Superintendent of the Nautical Almanac, the first appointment of a Superintendent. In 1828, when the Board was abolished, the Almanac came directly under the Board of the Admiralty, and Young continued as Superintendent and scientific adviser to the Admiralty.

On the death of Young the superintendence of the Almanac returned to Pond who was still Astronomer Royal.

 

Previous Top

Next

 
 

HM Nautical Almanac Office © Crown Copyright 2016